1970 CB750 Police Special

November 11, 2015

 

I bought this bike a couple of years ago and discovered after it arrived from the shipper that it was a factory original Police Special.

After looking into it further, I also discovered that the K0 version is extreemly rare for the US market.

As far as I can tell, only the LAPD bought a handful of them to test against the Moto Guzzi at the time.

The Guzzi won out and as a result, the 750 bikes were tossed.

The thing that make them extremely rare is that they not only have the special added brackets and reinforcements on the frame, but also the US spec VIN tag which were only on the US spec bikes.

This bike had been converted to a normal 750 for civilian use, but all the original brackets etc. were still in place.

It also had the police only handle bars, and there was white paint under all the repainted parts.

Unfortunately, I had to find all the actual police bike parts that were missing, such as the siren, seat, headlight bucket, speedo, crash bars, patrol lights, etc.

 

Article from Motohistory on LAPD bikes

 

Below is an interesting article mentioning the US spec CB750 Police bikes that were bought & tested by the LAPD.

 

Original Brouchere Picture for a CB750 K1 Police Special

 

In a recent article for Motohistory, Gary Smith (Retired LAPD Moto Officer) related the history of the Moto Guzzi police motorcycle designed for the LAPD. In the mid-1960s, prior to the Moto Guzzi, other motorcycles were tested for police use. The photo shown here is a 1966 Honda 450cc police version loaned to the LAPD by Honda for testing. Gary was one of many chosen to test the Honda 450 on the LA freeways. He writes, it handled nicely but was way underpowered. And, believe it or not, it leaked oil (Shhhhhh! Don't say anything to H-D about that). We also road tested BMW, Triumph 650s, Indian/Enfield, BSAs, and a Harley with a huge white fairing on it. We referred to this Harley as "the flying taco!"   Gary rode them all before the Guzzi came along, but none fit the bill. 

     LAPD Officer on a CB450 Police Special

 

When Honda came out with its CB750 Four, they did sell some to the LAPD, and later some had the Hondamatic transmissions. As the Honda 750s came in use at the LAPD, apparently the management felt no need to familiarize the riders with the first police bike having a disc front brake. Consequently, one of the old-timer Harley riders grabbed a handful of front brake, locked up the front wheel, and dumped his bike, breaking his elbow in the process. He sued Honda for "defective" brakes (they actually worked, compared to the old H-D front drum) and Honda said “bye-bye” to the police bike business for many years, due to concern for liability. 

  

When Gary retired from the LAPD, He went to Honda as an employee in 1981, and one of the first jobs they gave him was to reinvestigate the police bike market. He had several Japanese Honda Police 750s shipped to him, and He outfitted them with correct lighting for local use and loaned them to several police departments for trial.  Most of the cops who tested them were "Harley" boys who felt that a 750cc bike was not big enough for police work.

 

That pretty much did it for the 750 Honda’s future in the American Market for Police duty. Soon after, the Kawasaki 900/1000 Police Bikes became king in the Police Bike market.

 

As a result, there were only a handful of actual Factory Built CB750 Police bikes brought into the US. Actual numbers are not really known, but it was probably far less than 10 or 20 bikes that were actually built for the US market (Marked by the US DOT VIN tag on the steering head neck)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Please reload

Featured Posts

CBX Instrument Cluster Gauge Face Plates - High Quality Exact Reproductions

April 8, 2016

1/4
Please reload

Recent Posts

November 11, 2015

Please reload

Archive
Please reload

Search By Tags

I'm busy working on my blog posts. Watch this space!

Please reload

Follow Us
  • Facebook Basic Square
  • Twitter Basic Square
  • Google+ Basic Square

© 2017 by digitalpizza.com & Peter M. Rose

Proudly created with Wix.com